Freelance Knight

On My Shelf: Girls on Games

On My Shelf: Girls on Games

On My Shelf: Girls on Games

When the Kickstarter for Girls on Games: A Look at the Fairer Side of the Industry was launched two years ago, my daughters were just getting into roleplaying, and my freelance work was ramping up. The three of us were very interested in this book. Just read what the marketing pitch stated:

Girls on Games CoverAfter compiling stories and advice for years, Elisa Teague decided to write a book on the matter, and there is no better way to discuss such important topics than to include many voices with important viewpoints on the subject. So, we’ve gathered together some amazing contributors to each add a chapter on various game topics for a book that has never been seen before!

Our chapter topics include:

Anecdotes or stories about being a woman in the game industry
Advice for women on overcoming challenges women face in this field
Advice for men on how to make inclusion a reality in our great industry
Glass ceilings, male co-worker dealings, and general inequality of women in the field
Creating balanced game design for both men and women
Why games are important for girls
Dealing with “fake geek” or “real gamer” comments when playing games (or just existing) in mixed company
Two words: Booth Babes.
Female representation in games
Being taken seriously as a professional in a male-dominated category
Tips on getting your foot in the door at a game company
The pros and cons of Games “for girls”
and so much more!

Those topics really interested my daughters who loved gaming and had begun to experience the gaming industry through my freelancing work and managing a booth at Gen Con. Through various setbacks and challenges, the book did not reach print until this summer, with it arriving shortly after Gen Con 2016. It is available for purchase now on Amazon and various other locations. The updated marketing text gives the book a great overview.

Girls on Games is written by a compilation of female game industry professionals, with the aim to engage, entertain, and educate both seasoned gamers and game-makers as well as novice game inventors and those seeking positions within the tabletop game industry.

Girls on Gaming is a quick read, but a very enlightening and powerful discussion. I highly recommend the book for passionate gamers who want to know more about those who produce their favorite games, for anyone interested in the game industry, and as a dad, I especially recommend it for anyone with daughters who love gaming. If you have a young daughter interested in gaming, especially interested in being involved in the game industry, then this book will generate a lot of discussion around the dinner table and during car rides, trust me.

 

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